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Security in public spaces: your input needed

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In the scope of the Urban Innovative Actions, the European Commission would like to better understand the needs and approaches of urban authorities to security in public spaces. Answer this survey by 15 November to let us know your views and contribute to the debate on security.

Inhabitants of cities face a number of threats which may impact their personal security. According to recent statistics, the areas below represent the most significant security challenges, which might occur in public spaces. In the 2016 Eurobarometer, public opinion identified terrorism as one of the major challenges Europe faces. As evidenced by the public opinion and statistical findings, there is a gap between the perception of security and the reported crimes.

  • Violence against women: In the EU-28, 18 % of women have experienced stalking since the age of 15.[1] One in 20 women (5 %) has been raped since the age of 15.[2]
  • Sexual violence[3]: In 2015, the police recorded 134 592 sexual violence offenses in the EU.[4]
  • Intentional homicide[5]: In 2015, the police recorded 4 528 intentional homicide offenses in the EU.[6]
  • Kidnapping: In 2015, the police recorded 14 886 kidnapping offences.[7]
  • Theft[8]: In 2015, the police recorded 7 542 702 theft offenses in the EU.[9]
  • Terrorism: In 2016, a total of 142 failed, foiled and completed attacks were reported by EU Member States, with 142 victims, and 379 were injured.[10]

In the scope of the Urban Innovative Actions, the European Commission would like to better understand the needs and approaches of urban authorities to security in public spaces. Based on the outcomes of this survey, the future calls of the Urban Innovative Actions may address security challenges in public spaces.

The fight against terrorism, organised crime and cybercrime are not among the thematic objectives set out in the Cohesion Policy Regulations. Nevertheless, investments which contribute to the economic, social and territorial cohesion of the Union may include measures addressing security challenges.

Please answer this questionnaire and let us know your views before 15 November.

 

 

[1] Fundamental Rights Agency (2014) Violence against women: an EU-wide survey. Main results report

[2] Fundamental Rights Agency (2014) Violence against women: an EU-wide survey. Main results report

[3] Sexual violence includes rape and other sexual assault. Rape is defined as sexual intercourse without valid consent and sexual assault refers to sexual violence not amounting to rape. Sexual assault includes an unwanted sexual act, an attempt to obtain a sexual act, or contact or communication with unwanted sexual attention not amounting to rape. It also includes sexual assault with or without physical contact, including drug-facilitated sexual assault; sexual assault committed against a marital partner against her/his will, sexual assault against a helpless person, unwanted groping or fondling, harassment and threats of a sexual nature. For more information see Eurostat, 'Crime and criminal justice statistics'

[5] Intentional homicide is defined as an unlawful death purposefully inflicted on a person by another person, including serious assault leading to death and death as a result of a terrorist attack. Attempted homicide, manslaughter, death due to legal intervention, justifiable homicide in self-defence and death due to armed conflict are excluded. For more information see Eurostat, 'Crime and criminal justice statistics'

[6] Eurostat, 'Crime and criminal justice statistics'

[7] Kidnapping is defined as unlawfully detaining a person or persons against their will (including through the use of force, threat, fraud or enticement) for the purpose of demanding for their liberation an illicit gain or any other economic gain or other material benefit, or in order to oblige someone to do or not to do something. Disputes over child custody are excluded from this definition. For more information see Eurostat, 'Crime and criminal justice statistics'

[8] Theft is defined as depriving a person or organisation of property without force with the intent to keep it. For the purpose of this article, theft excludes burglary, housebreaking, robbery and theft of a motor vehicle. For more information see Eurostat, 'Crime and criminal justice statistics'

[9] Eurostat, 'Crime and criminal justice statistics'